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Hi Helmy, If you use the GUI to create the availability group, it requires you have the same path / ...

could you please share the needed class files (or the D2.jar) it seems, this class is missing

me
but when i am gonna create an AG the following error shown >> the following folder locations do not ...
Helmy Mohamed
Nice one! I like the outfit of the characters. Wish i could do the same thing too but im not that te...
utah

Can someone please forward me all the netbackup commands with detail information I want CLI.

Shekhar D
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Blog of Franck Pachot, Consultant at dbi services

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Franck Pachot

Franck Pachot

Franck Pachot is Consultant at dbi services. He has 20 years of experience in Oracle databases. Through his expertise as a DBA, Oracle expert, data architect, and performance specialist, he is able to cover all database areas: architecture, data modeling, database design, tuning, operation, and training. Franck Pachot knows how to enable an efficient collaboration between the developers and the operational team when it comes to troubleshooting issues or performance tuning. He has passed the OCP certifications from 8i to 12c, is also Certified Expert for Oracle Database 11g Performance Tuning, and now achived the highest level of certification: Oracle Master Certified OCM 11g. Prior to joining dbi services, Franck Pachot was Oracle Consultant at Trivadis in Lausanne. Previously, he worked in several countries and environements, always as a consultant. Franck Pachot holds a Master of Business Informatics from the University of Paris-Sud. His branch-related experience covers Financial Services / Banking, Public Sector, Food, Transport and Logistics, Pharma, etc.


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Recently, I described the Partial Join Evaluation transformation that appeared last year in Oracle 12c. I did it as an introduction for another transformation that appeared long time ago in 10.1.0.3 but was not used by default. And even in the latest Oracle 12c patchset 1 (aka 12.1.0.2.0) it is still not enabled. But it's there and you can use it if you set optimizer_features_enabled to 12.1.0.2.1 (that's not a typo!).

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When an Oracle Database spends a high percentage of its DB time in User I/O, I usually check the wait event histograms in order to see if the storage system is working well. But today, with storage going to SSD, most I/O are less than 1 milliseconds and we have no details about those wait times.

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Do you remember last year, when 12c arrived with multitenant, David Hueber warned us about the fact that a single PDB can, under certain conditions, generate a complete system downtime? We are beta testers and opened a SR for that. Now one year later the first patchset is out and obviously I checked if the issue was fixed. It's a patchset afterall, which is expected to fix issues before than bringing new features.

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In a previous post, I have described Adaptive Plans. Even if I prefer to show plans with the SQL Monitor active html format, I had to stick with the dbms_xplan for that because SQL Monitoring did not show all information about adaptive plans.

Tagged in: Oracle 12c
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It's just a patchset. The delivery that is there to stabilize a release with all the bug fixes. But it comes with a lot of new features as well. And not only the one that has been advertised as the future of the database. It's a huge release.

Tagged in: In-memory Oracle 12c
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In a previous post I used X$KCCAGF to get more information about reclaimable archived logs in FRA, because there is a bug in standby (not opened) databases where archivelog deletion policy is ignored. I explained that the view V$RECOVERY_AREA_USAGE has only aggregated information about space reclaimable without the details about which files are reclaimable or not. Here I'll explain how I came to X$KCCAGF and I'll give the query to get all the detailed information that is hidden behind V$RECOVERY_AREA_USAGE.

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In a previous post about nproc limit, I wrote that I had to investigate the nproc limit with the number of threads because my Oracle 12c EM agent was having thousands of threads. This post is a short feedback about this issue and the way I have found the root cause. It concerns the enterprise manager agent 12c on Grid Infrasctructure >= 11.2.0.2

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Do you think that it's better to write semi-join SQL statements with IN(), EXISTS(), or to do a JOIN? Usually, the optimizer will evaluate the cost and do the transformation for you. And in this area, one more transformation has been introduced in 12c which is the Partial Join Evaluation (PJE).

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I've read this morning that MapReduce is dead. The first time I heard about MapReduce was when a software architect proposed to stop writing SQL on Oracle Database and replace it with MapReduce processing. Because the project had to deal with a huge amount of data in a small time and they had enough budget to buy as many cores as they need, they wanted the scalability of parallel distributed processing.

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In a previous post I explained how to measure the number of processes that are generated when a fork() or clone() call checks the nproc limit. There is another limit in /etc/limits.conf - or in /etc/limits.d - that is displayed by 'ulimit -n'. It's the number of open files - 'nofile' - and here again we need to know what kind of files are counted.

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